1764 – ST. LOUIS FOUNDED BY PIERRE LACLEDE

Pierre Laclede Liguest, recipient of a land grant from the King of France, and his 14-year-old scout, Auguste Chouteau, selected the site of St. Louis in 1764 as a fur trading post. Laclede and Chouteau chose the location because it was not subject to flooding and was near the confluence of the Mississippi and Missouri Rivers. Construction of a village, named for Louis IX of France, began the following year. Most of the early settlers were French; many were associated with the fur trade.


1803 – LOUISIANA PURCHASE SIGNED

The town gained fame in 1803 as the jumping-off point for the Louisiana Purchase Expedition of Meriwether Lewis and William Clark. After 1804, more New Englanders and other East Coast emigrants settled in St. Louis, but the population remained predominantly French until well into the 19th-Century. St. Louis incorporated as a city in 1823. During the 19th-Century, St. Louis grew into an important center of commerce and trade, attracting thousands of immigrants eager to find a new life on the edge of the frontier.


1904 – WORLD’S FAIR AND 1904 OLYMPICS

One of the City’s great moments came in 1904, when it hosted a World’s Fair: the Louisiana Purchase Exposition, in Forest Park and the city’s western edge. The 1904 Olympic games were also held in St. Louis, at Washington University’s Francis Field, in conjunction with the fair. More than 20 million people visited the fair during its seven-month run, immortalized in the song “Meet Me in St. Louie, Louie.”


EARLY 20TH CENTURY – EXPANSION

Through the early 20th-Century, St. Louis continued to industrialize. By 1940, over 800,000 people lived in the City of St. Louis. After World War II, the City’s population peaked at 856,000 by 1950. This crowded city had no more room to grow within its fixed boundaries, and much of the housing stock had been neglected during the Great Depression. Thus any new growth had to occur in the suburbs in St. Louis County, which St. Louis could not annex. Earlier immigrant generations gradually moved to suburbia.


1965 – THE GATEWAY ARCH & JEFFERSON NATIONAL EXPANSION MEMORIAL

The Gateway Arch (Jefferson National Expansion Memorial) designed by Eero Saarinen was completed. Located on the original settlement site of St. Louis, it symbolizes the role of St. Louis in the development of the western frontier. At the same time, growing interest in preservation of historic neighborhoods–partly fueled by Federal tax credits–led to the revitalization of the Central West End, DeBaliviere Place, Soulard, and Lafayette Square neighborhoods during the 1970s and early 1980s.


STL TODAY

Today, revitalization efforts continue in St. Louis. The city’s central corridor boasts a strong community driven by innovation, inclusive opportunities and a youthful vibe. The Central West End, home to 1764 Public House and two other Gamlin Restaurant Group restaurants, was named one of the nation’s top 10 neighborhoods for its walkability, access to amenities and attractions, and 24/7 energy thanks to its proximity to Forest Park, Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Cortex Innovation Community.